Feature | February 6, 2015
Fives: Mixes of the Week, February 6th


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There’s a feeling that you get from a good moment in a good mix, a transition that elides boundaries, a choice cut surfacing when you least expect it. It’s when you know you’re in good hands. These five mixes are lousy with moments like that, and you’ll know them when you hear them. We’ve got some favorites and some newcomers, with the top spot going to someone we’ve never heard from before, Fives or otherwise. We’ll go from soulful gems on wax to clean-cut, up-to-the-minute dancefloor anthems. Settle in, you’ve got time.

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5. Caribou :: 7” Mix on Gilles Peterson Worldwide

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Two previous Fives-certified selectors, one playing host to the other. It’s a short whirl through “the box that belongs to Mr. Dan Snaith,” as Peterson pointedly refers to it—maybe he’s jealous. It’s a lot of strange dots to join, from a creepy soul ode to Sputnik to Malian jazz to a narcotized Canned Heat jam that sounds like a conductor’s dream as his train derails. We would never have said of either Snaith or Peterson that they’d bring anything less than breadth, and this mix cements that.

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4. Danny Daze :: SUNDAY MORNING #1 

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We read somewhere this week that dolphins sleep by rising to the surface of the water, drifting off, and slowly sinking until they’re woken by hitting something, presumably the ocean floor. Also presumably, this takes place in somewhat shallow waters. Double also, we’re pretty unsure as to the provenance of this account, since we can’t even remember where we read it. But we thought about this imaginary process while we listened to this inaugural chill-out parade from Miami club fixture Danny Daze, about each carefully selected track as a slow descent in a blissed-out dream of a post-party comedown. The Sunday Morning series will aim to provide a voice for “experimental yet eloquent” productions, and that’s on-point–it’s an hour of pads you can submerse your head in and calm, emotionally precise grooves.

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3. Mike Petillo :: Extended Family Mix #1

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One-half of the District’s own weirdo-housemeisters Protect-U inaugurates another mix series, this one a hometown-focused monthly, with a submersed slurry of dub and deep house that gets to the bottom of it things. When it gets there—around the time Mix-O-Rap’s grody “For Thugz” collides with Colourbox’s unfathomable, wobbled-out “Baby I Love You So”—it takes its time coming back up, through esoterica and bangers alike. Things come to a head with the closing edit of “I Feel Love,” which threads that divide quite nicely—a reinvigorated, left-field freaked-out hit. Petillo sets the bar high for whoever’s next in the Extended Family tree.

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2. Bake :: Rinse FM

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For the second installment of his monthly slot, the Glaswegian crate-digger and All Caps associate aims to “let the music do the talking,” and for the first five minutes, it talks in clattering metal. Then it’s beatless washes and blippy synth star-maps. Then it’s onto burners left and right, from weirdos like Actress and — hey! Mix-O-Rap’s back! It takes a certain kind of mixing mind to fit it all together like this, to take the space-exploration stuff as far as it can go and warp it all the way back to whacked, stomping grooves; Bake is proving himself to be a reliable guide to that mind-bending journey. The twists and turns are always worth it–hell, they’re half the point.

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1. Bambii :: THUMP Mix

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Bambii’s a Toronto selector with nary a production to her name, though that’s subject to change. If her mix for THUMP is any indication, she’s set behind the decks for now, thanks. From the opening blitz of HudMo’s go-for-broke remix of Four Tet’s “Parallel Jalebi,” voiced-over by Jodie Foster in Contact (“I had an experience!”), it’s an expert demonstration of assemblage and quicksilver mixing. When you do a double-take when the hands-up! remix of Missy’s “Lose Control” by Machinedrum (for whom Bambii’s spun an opening set in the past) turns on a dime into Father’s undeniable “Wrist,” you’ll know you’re in the hands of a real-life up-and-comer.